ANTI-SLAVERY
SOCIETY

FIGHTING SLAVERY TODAY

Forced Labor

Forced labor is a practice of compulsory labor exacted by a state or by agencies of a state, other than as a punishment for a criminal offence.  It was quite common in the French, German, Belgian, Portuguese and Spanish colonies in Africa, and, to a lesser degree, in the British colonies (where the inhabitants performed such labor in lieu of taxation).

Today, it involves the forcible recruitment by the Tatmadaw (the Burmese army) of small farmers, their wives and children to work as human mine-detectors, porters and laborers.

It also involves people who have been imprisoned without trial in labor reform camps in China and North Korea because of their religious or political beliefs.

Under Article 1 of Convention (No 29) concerning Forced Labour 1930, parties to the Convention undertake to suppress the use of forced labor.

Under Article 1 of the Convention (No 105) concerning the Abolition of Forced Labour 1957, parties to the Convention undertake to suppress and not to make use of forced labor as a means, inter alia, of punishment for holding or expressing political views or views ideologically opposed to the established political, social or economic system.
 

THE SOCIETY IN ACTION

The Society publishes a Consumer Alert to alert consumers to products which are made in horrific conditions by those imprisoned by the Chinese government for their religious or political beliefs.

THIS IS THE SOCIETY IN ACTION 

Further Information

For more information, read the Society’s publication entitled Consumer Alert ($11.00).  Price includes postage.

 

Links to other pages dealing with this issue:

Different forms of child labor

Children in the carpet weaving industry

Rugmark rugs and carpets

Goods made by child labor

Child soldiers


The Society is not responsible for the content of external internet sites. 

SLAVERY SLAVE
TRADE
HUMAN
SACRIFICE

BONDED
LABOR

HIERODULIC
SERVITUDE

TRAFFICKING

CHILD
LABOR

  2003 by the Anti-Slavery Society. The text on any page may be reproduced provided that the source is acknowledged.  This does not apply to photos.